Grant County Extension Connection

Episode 12: Proper Use of Personal Protective Equipment During Quarantine

May 20, 2020 Jessica Swapp Season 1 Episode 12
Grant County Extension Connection
Episode 12: Proper Use of Personal Protective Equipment During Quarantine
Show Notes Transcript

While most people are at home, many of them have gone to the outdoors to get some yard work done. People are gardening, watering and using chemical controls against pesky weeds. Dr. Leslie Beck, NMSU Extension Weed Specialist gives some really good advice on staying safe while applying those chemicals as well as other alternatives.

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Jessica :

Welcome to the Extension Connection podcast. The Grant County Cooperative Extension Service is here to help connect you with research based information about economic development, energy and water, farm and ranch, yard and garden, natural resources, health and well being, and our very popular youth development program 4-H. I'm your host, Jessica Swapp, the 4-H and agriculture agent here in Grant County, New Mexico. We are part of New Mexico State University's College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Science and we are here to serve you. So let's get started. Hi everyone. I thought it might be appropriate to ask Dr. Leslie Beck back onto the podcast. Um, just because everybody's doing a little bit more yard work nowadays. Um, life has kind of changed for all of us, so we're getting outside, we're doing yard work. Um, and I thought it was important to touch base with her on the safety aspects of , um, some of the things you might be doing outside. Um, as you know, there's a shortage on , uh, protective equipment. So we kind of dive deep into , um, what we need to do and what can be done and the proper procedures , um, that need to be taken in order to , to get things taken care of in your landscape. So I hope you'll enjoy

Speaker 1:

[Weed eater sound effect]

Jessica :

Welcome to the podcast today. Um, I have a guest that you've heard from before, Dr. Leslie Beck who is the extension weed specialist and she's coming back on the podcast today to talk about some different , um, subjects as they relate to what's going on right now. So , um, some things about , uh, protective, personal protective equipment, otherwise known as PPE. There's some shortages. Um, she's gonna kind of give us the heads up on all of that. So welcome to the podcast today, Leslie.

Leslie :

Thank you for having me. I'm so excited to be here.

Jessica :

I'm glad to have you back. Yeah, so your info on the whole dandelion thing, like totally cursed me cause my lawn was taken over by dandelions shortly after I released that podcast. I'm blaming you.

Leslie :

Well, you know, it's my fault as the weeds keep coming back. T hat's why my voice sounds the way it does today. I think they're getting their revenge on me allergy wise. S o hopefully I won't cough and sneeze. But the good thing is, is that based on what we talked about, you're raring to go in the fall when it's the most opportune time to get them right?

Jessica :

Right. I attempted to control them a little bit and then I just, I've just given up at this point if it's green it gets to stay.

Leslie :

Yeah and that situation, they just kind of look at you and go, neener neener you know.

Jessica :

Yeah they straight up were like, ha ha lady , you don't scare me. So , but speaking of , uh, you know, weeds and weed management and stuff , um, with the COVID-19 stuff that's going on , um, you know, when you're using , uh , some of these herbicides, you need to protect yourself with personal protective equipment. But that's , that's becoming kind of a, there's a shortage coming with that. Do you want to talk about that a little bit?

Leslie :

Yeah. We're , we're getting a lot of questions about what , what we can anticipate with the upcoming or actually the , uh , personal protective equipment shortage that we're experiencing now that quite frankly, I don't see, you know , becoming less of an issue , uh, by the end of the year even. I think personal protective equipment is going to continue to be scarce, mostly because it is being diverted to essential workers , uh, medical personnel , uh, workers in the field , workers in the fields and at supermarkets, things along those lines. And honestly, I think that's absolutely appropriate. So what we're going to talk about today, or I hope we're going to talk about today is just a couple of considerations when , uh, when making these pesticide applications , uh, and what type of personal protective equipment to use. You know, what kind of language that we need to look at on the, or what do we need to look at on the label to know what we need to apply and how we can not necessarily think about alternatives. And I'll explain about why that's important in a moment, but really take into consideration a lot of the things that we teach in our pesticide applicator trainings about a safe usage of personal protective equipment, but also , uh , maintenance , uh, personal protective equipment , uh , taking care of your PPE in order to extend the life or the effectiveness of that PPE as long as possible, if it is indeed something that can be reused. So we'll talk about that.

Jessica :

Right. All right , so I'm going to let you just roll right into it. Tell me everything I need to know.

Leslie :

Well, I think one of the big, one of the big questions that we're getting right now that I kind of want to really focus on here at the very beginning because I think this is the most important thing to consider moving forward when we start talking about PPE and labels and everything, is that we're getting a lot of questions about whether or not a lot of these , uh, homemade , uh, personal protective equipment that has been recommended for use , uh , when you're out and about to try to protect you from , uh , you know, infection from Covid-19, especially homemade masks and whether or not those have applicability and pesticide applicator applications as well. And I'm here to tell you, and, and NMDA will completely back me up on this, that , um, the label is law

Sound Effect:

danger, danger.

Leslie :

And that's not a euphemism that is a, that is a real legally binding contract. And therefore, DIY and other aspects of PPE that aren't mentioned are there that go against the recommendation in the label itself are not applicable in pesticide application. So the DIY mask , um, I've seen people using , uh , uh , Walmart sacks and plastic sacks to cover their hands when they're at the gas station. And that's absolute absolutely applicable in that tiny situation for a limited amount of time. But when you're out making a pesticide application, that's not going to work. It's going to be cumbersome. You're not going to have your hands free in order to, in order to do what you're doing appropriately and safely. So these have no applicability and pesticide applications and mainly because they also, they're not , uh , they don't protect you against the actual pesticides themselves. Some of these chemicals, you know , have the ability to bypass some of these filters and these plastic bags and everything like that. That's why the label recommend specific types of gloves or specific types of respirators that you have to have to wear. And if that's the case, you have to go with the label every time.

Jessica :

Yeah. Yeah. So following the label, I mean, this is really for your own good.

Leslie :

Absolutely.

Jessica :

It's just for your own protection.

Leslie :

Absolutely. And that's, that's, you hit the nail right on the head that these recommendations are in the label in order to protect the applicator, to protect from a unintentional offsite damage, things along those lines. So if it says to use a specific type of respirator in the label, then you don't have the option of maybe reaching for another type of respirator that you still have in your, in your storage. So what I wanted to do is , uh, is really , uh, talk about that. And also another thing to consider that I get a question about quite frequently is that if your tank mixing , uh , different pesticides together in the same tank, in order to broaden the spectrum of the pest that you're able to control, which label do you follow as far as personal protective equipment? You know, cause there might be one label and there's one label for one product, there's one label for another product, which one do you follow? And in that situation, always follow the most restrictive language , um , in one of her labels. So if one label calls for the use of a respirator and one label doesn't, then you wear the respirator, when you're tank mixing those products together.

Jessica :

Right, right.

Leslie :

So that's another thing to consider as far as safety goes. That's a question I get quite kind of frequently too.

Jessica :

Yeah. Yeah. And so, you know, if you, if you're gonna apply something that you need a respirator for and you don't have a respirator right now, it's probably not a good time to try to buy one or find one. Um, what is your advice on that? Probably just shouldn't , uh, probably should look for some alternatives, don't you think?

Leslie :

Absolutely. Yeah. So, you know, the , the first thing to do is always try to make sure that you have the appropriate personal protective equipment in your storage if you can find it. So if you make applications that utilize this protection, personal protective equipment quite frequently, then you may want to try to see if you can find , um , a product in order to purchase in order to build up your stores. But of course, like we said, that's going to be difficult. And quite frankly, I find that becoming more and more difficult as we progress . So one of the alternatives certainly is to consider the effectiveness of alternative pesticides that don't require the use of a respirator, that there's many of them out there. Herbicides specifically. There's only a handful of them that actually require a respirator during mixing and applying. But of course when you're talking about other pesticides, insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, you know , depending on what kind of pest you're applying, respirators are certainly more prevalent. Um, and so if you can find an alternative pesticide that doesn't require the use of a respirator but still garners the same amount of pest control , uh , then maybe it might be worth, you know , switching your , uh, the pesticide that you're, you're typically applying just in the midst of a shortage at least. Uh , just because again, those things are not available.

Jessica :

I was going to say I mean if all else fails. I mean, I think that, you know, controlling the weed or protecting your own health. I mean, we're going to choose ourselves before we control, you know , the weed , you know?

Leslie :

Absolutely. Yeah , certainly. And you know, so there's a lot of questions about um, uh, where that language is within the, within the label itself. So one of the things that I also want to point out, especially in regards to respirators, is that it's really important to read the entire language of the label because there might be different areas of uh , pesticide exposure that you have to a respirator for. So say the label, my , uh , specifically recommend wearing a respirator when you're mixing or when you're measuring out the product, if it's a powder, something along those. So the other thing is that applicator's should always note , uh, any changes or any recommendations for what we call re-entry intervals. That acronym is REI intervals and post-harvest intervals, PHI if you're in agriculture. And what that is, is that is a, is a specific amount of time recommended in the label that you're going to re-enter the area that has been , uh, that has been sprayed for a certain amount of time after that application that perhaps you need to be using personal protective equipment for. So say for 24 hours after you make an application, if you want to enter this area, you have to make sure you have a respirator or you have to have certain equipment on and in that case, the alternative is always there, might be to just completely restrict access to that area as much as possible just so you don't have to depend on having a limited supply of respirators just to reenter that area if that's possible. Again, probably the best thing would be to try to make applications of a pesticide that will generate the same amount of pest control but not require the use of the respirators .

Jessica :

Right. Right .

Leslie :

So some people are questioning, a lot of the questions that I get is like, well, I have this product, do I need a respirator? And of course my, my answer is always read the label. Uh , currently I have an extension publication that's in the review process, so hopefully that'll be coming into print within the next few weeks. Um, that is really covering the air of the information that we're talking about today that I , uh, that I wrote with , uh , other professors. Dr. Amanda Skidmore and Phillip Lujan, as well as representatives from New Mexico Department of Agriculture, Steven Baca and Nathan Abramson. And what we have in this publication along with , uh, the section on respirators is references to a couple of websites. So some universities are starting to put together a comprehensive list of pesticides , uh , and, and what their category is or what their requirements are for a certain PPE, specifically respirators. So some of them are just listing as many , uh, products as they , uh, as many pesticides as they possibly can within their state that are labeled within their state and determining whether or not they need a respirator or not. Some of them are going for the approach of only listing pesticides that don't require a respirator in the current situation. So these are really good resources, quick resources. But of course, you know, once you look up a product on this, on this list to see whether or not it requires a respirator or not , the recommendation is always to go back to the label and make sure that that recommendation is still up to date. Because labels change all the time. As we know. So when in doubt, the label is law and whatever it says on the label that you need to wear, that's what you need to wear.

Jessica :

Right, right. And , uh , what about , um, you know, some things on IPM ?

Leslie :

So absolutely. So in the absence of , uh, yeah, in the absence of , uh , the proper PPE that's recommended by the label, if there's not a comparative pesticide that would , uh, generate this, the appropriate level of pest control that's available, that doesn't require a respirator. But one of the things that we can always depend on, and quite frankly, I would say one of the most important aspects of any type of pest management, weed, insects, diseases, vertebrae pest, is incorporating integrating pest managment. There are other management techniques that we can utilize such as a preventative measures. So in the case of weeds, I think we've talked about some of these in the other podcast. I have a feeling we're , I think we're scheduled to probably do a more in depth podcasts in the future on integrated pest management to really go into these categories that I'm talking about. But , um , a preventative measure . So in the case of weeds, preventing weed seed from coming into your area in the first place. So when you go out hiking or walking, check the bottom of your shoes to make sure you don't have goat heads on the bottom of your shoes. You know, if you do pick them out before you go into your property, that's preventative measures . These have mechanics. So the use of tools in order to remove or damage or prevent the weeds from germinating successfully. So most people ask me, what's the most effective method of organic control? And that would be your hands . Haven't developed a resistance to them yet. And they're pretty effective at what they do depending on the weed, of course. Um, there's also cultural control. So there's a little bit of confusion as to what the difference between cultural and mechanical control is. Cultural control is any of the inputs that you put into your desirable plant . So say you have a garden in your backyard, you're going to water that garden, you're going to fertilize that garden. You're probably going to put mulch down in order to prevent weeds from coming up in the garden because the healthier your plant is, the more vegetables and the more fruit that you get from it. But also the more it's able to out compete , uh , weeds that are starting to come up during the season. So the healthier the plant is, the more competitive it is with the weeds as opposed to mechanical control, which is just the use of tools. Yes, I do. I do also any questions on biological control? Quite a bit. Um, we'll probably talk about that in more in depth. But biological control is only going to be applicable with certain weeds and certain insects in many cases. And as far as how effective they are , um, they can injure the weed. They're a great tool to have in your tool belt, but for the most part, it's not ecologically smart for them to kill their hosts because once they do, there's no more food. So you can't really depend on, you know, going out into your backyard and releasing all of these wonderful insects that are going to only eat your field bind weed in your backyard. Because field bindweed grows very quickly. The insects are probably small. They can't cause enough damage in the short enough amount of time to actually kill the weeds . The other thing is they're probably going to fly over into your neighbor's yard, right where you want them to say no, they don't really pay attention to, Oh well you , you've purchased me online so I need to stay in this yard. But um, so the idea is is that the more you combine these management practices together, hopefully the less we have to be dependent on herbicides so we can reduce our inputs. Now, herbicides and pesticides absolutely have a place in integrated pest management, but the idea is that we exhaust all of these other options that could be effective against the weed, depending on the weed. And then we save our herbicide applications for the big, the big bad guys that really don't respond to these other management practices very well. Therefore we reduce our inputs. But utilizing IPM is, is , is doing a lot of what we talked about on our last podcast is, is really focusing your management on the biology of the weed. So even when utilizing hand tools there's an appropriate time to do that. You want to do it before the seed forms or before the plant gets so large and the root gets so deep that you don't get all of it when you pull it up. Then the same with herbicides. You want to make applications when the plant is actively growing when its young because if you wait until the pigweed plants is as tall as me and I'm roughly 5'10" , um, it's way too mature. It's just not going to respond. And therefore any herbicides that you apply is nothing but a wasted application, something that's been put into the environment that doesn't need to be there and it's not going to generate the goal that you had intended in the first place. So IPM can be an appropriate use of all of these management practices. And again, targeting our management specifically for the weed. And quite frankly, in the absence of, in the absence of the use of pesticides, particularly, particularly if we don't have access to the required personal protective equipment as designated by the label, then that's pretty much all we have at our disposal. It could be a very, very effective tool and quite frankly should be utilized even when you are making pesticide applications, if that makes sense.

Jessica :

Right, right. Yeah. There's a time and a place for everything.

Leslie :

Absolutely. Absolutely. So as we were talking about, you know, that's , that's what we're here for as far as extension. If you don't know what the weed is in your landscape, you know, they can send you a picture. If you're not sure, you can send it to me and we'll work as hard as we can to identify that weed . Cause that's the first step. Once that's the case start putting, We can start building an entire management practice utilizing all of these different practices and where applicable and when that's going to be the most opportune time to do so. Yes. I completely agree. So is there anything else you want to share with us today? Well, I mean there's a, there's a couple of other , uh, parts of personal protective equipment that I wanted to just kind of address. Um , going back to respirators just for a moment. I, I'm sorry, I didn't , uh , mention this when we were on the subject. Um, the other important thing to consider with respirators is, is just general , um, practice general practices like during applications and when removing your personal protective equipment that can also maintain the integrity of your respirator for an extended period of time. So when you're making applications, and this is one thing that they're talking about with the homemade masks, with the covid situation, is that it tends to give people a false sense of security and therefore they're touching their face more often because they're wearing a mask.

Jessica :

Ah...

Leslie :

And so when you're making a pesticide application and you have your gloves on that have been mixing these pesticides that have been worn when spraying pesticides, you certainly don't want to reach up and make adjustments to your mask or take your mask off or just put it back on when you have contaminants on your hand . There's a hierarchy when , uh , when removing personal protective equipment to make sure to limit the amount of contamination , uh , for certain other pieces of equipment. So with respirators , um, and most people who are people who have pesticide applicator licenses, know this, you actually have to have a training in order to, to , uh , appropriately wear and size your respirator mask. And the idea behind that is it that if your mask fits appropriately, you're wearing it appropriately. There's no need to , um, put as use your hands to continually make adjustments. It shouldn't be flipping , it should be moving, it shouldn't be bothering you. Um, and the other thing is that it's important to wear your respirator correctly. So one of the things that, I don't know if you've seen it , uh , when you ended up going grocery shopping, like I do people walking around with masks and their nose is sticking out the top and it's like , uh...

Jessica :

Yeah, what's the point?

Leslie :

And you know, granted it is annoying when you're wearing a mask. I have glasses and every time I wear my mask cause I breathe , my glasses fog up. But, and it's annoying. I completely get that, but at the same time, that also tells me that that map is probably appropriate because if, if things are having a difficult time getting out, they're probably having a difficult time getting in too , um, which leads to the fogging of your glasses. So , um, uh , the other thing is that when you're making a pesticide application, one indication that you know, it's not as always as easy as just putting a mask on because if it's not fitted appropriately, you don't have the training to know if it's fitted appropriately, then you're still exposed to inhalation of those pesticides. So anytime you're making an application and you have a respirator on and you can smell the chemical aspects of that application, odds are you're probably not wearing a respirator correctly. The other thing is to maintain safety. If you have a respirator that is more permanent, that has filter inserts, anytime you put that respirator on and you can smell residue of the pesticide in those filters, it's time to change those filters. So if you don't have filters after that point, then of course that's when we have to start considering maybe alternate methods of control, even using alternate pesticides that don't require that respirator. But the other thing that I did want to touch on that I get , uh , quite a few questions on is , uh, is gloves. What do we do in the absence of gloves? Because , uh, just like respirators, those disposable gloves are , are really hard to find right now and especially hard because everybody's wearing them as well. They should be. So one of the things I wanted to point out is that , uh, especially people who were essential workers, they really don't have a choice in that instance. They need those disposable gloves, medical personnel, when they go from person to person, they have to be able to dispose or to take off those gloves, throw them away, change them out, in order to protect themselves and the people that they're dealing with. The benefit with pesticide applications is that we, we have quite a few options for , uh, uh, for gloves at our disposal that have a little bit more longevity than say, the disposable nitrile gloves, which are going to be the ones that are really hard to find right now. There are different , um , uh, there are different , uh , sorry. Uh , there are different materials that comprise gloves such as neoprene , uh, butyl gloves , barrier laminate, vicom. Some of these are gonna be more expensive, some of these thicker , um, they may not be applicable in every application sense just because the thicker they are, the more cumbersome they are. But , um, uh, and in many cases, the label will make a recommendation of wear gloves that are waterproof or wear gloves that are chemical resistant. And that that's a designation that's important to understand because if a glove is waterproof only, it may not be resistant to , uh, uh, to penetration from certain chemicals. And so that was not appropriate in that situation. But if you are wearing , uh , or if you are utilizing gloves that have more longevity such as the , uh , such as the butyl , uh, rubber or neoprene barrier laminate, vicon , um, as I'm talking about with respirators, it's really important to follow that sort of chain of command when you're , uh, when you're cleaning, removing pesticides or your personal protective equipment after making an application. So in many cases, the first thing you do is you take off your gloves. Well, depending on the gloves , there are certain ways to remove those gloves in order to minimize the contaminants your bare hand . The other thing is the first thing you do after removing a glove is you wash your hands regardless of if it's disposable or whatever the material is. Um, but if the material is thicker and is meant to be used for application after application, you know, you would wash those gloves first before taking them off so you can wash the gloves in soap and water in the same way that you do your hand before removing those gloves. Once you do, you wash your hands . The other thing is that you want to make sure that you're removing your gloves when going from task to task. So if you just got done mixing your herbicide, your , uh , herbicide mixture and putting it in the tank and you're going to get the in the vehicle to, you know, take the tank out to the , uh, area of your field in which you're going to make the application. You need to take your gloves off, you need to change them or you need to clean them. Otherwise you're going to get contaminants on the steering wheel and in the cab of whatever vehicle you're using in order to pull the , um, uh, to pull the sprayer. So, you know, load up all of their stuff, get into their truck, go to the next location without changing their gloves. And that just helps to spread contamination all through the cab. You could get that on your personal clothes. If you take that home, then all of a sudden there's contamination in midst of your family. So it's really important to make sure that you're changing your PPE. You're cleaning your PPE and you're removing it appropriately to minimize carrying, contamination beyond the task that you're doing. Uh , the other thing that I didn't talk about with respirators that would apply to gloves that would apply to , um, really any personal protective equipment is storage adequate storage. So obviously you might not be making pesticide applications every single day. So if you have respirators and gloves and Tyvek suits that are meant to be used in multiple applications situations, you're going to want to store those appropriately. You want to store the you to make sure that they're clean before putting them away for storage. Um , you want to make sure that you're not storing them in the same place that you store your pesticides or that they would be exposed to pesticides. So instead of just throwing them in the backseat of your truck, you know, maybe once your gloves dry or your respirator dry , put them in a plastic bag or put them in a Tupperware that protects them from being contaminated from other sources. The other thing is that you want to make sure that you store this equipment out of direct sunlight because of course, sunlight, UV light, break down certain materials. And if your gloves, say for instance, are sitting in their appropriate Tupperware container that's fully exposed to the light, next time you go and reach for them, they may be more brittle and they have tears and therefore they can't be used as your personal protective equipment because the materials have been compromised. Um, I guess another one of the questions I, I typically get that I want to cover right quick is , um, is what happens when, you know, the label only calls for long sleeves and long pants, closed toed shoes. That's pretty much any pesticide. And quite frankly, my motto is always, always better to be safer than sorry. Even when I'm in my backyard, just applying fertilizers or even if I'm applying organic options, because we talked in the last presentation about the fact that they could be injurious as well. I always have at least long pants on closed toed shoes, most likely gloves if I have them available. Um , I can't say how many times I've been driving through neighborhoods and I see people in shorts and flip flops making applications of whatever's in that tank. Obviously that's not appropriate, but right when you , yeah, when you spray in long pants, it may be that you get a little bit of contaminants on your clothes. What do you do then? So the recommendation is always, always to have a separate washing system for your pesticide clothes . If you're just making an application in your backyard of an over the counter products that make sure you wash those clothes completely separate from that of your family or your regular clothes that have not been exposed to pesticides. You might want to wash them on multiple cycles. I've heard anywhere from two is recommended, three is better. Just make sure you get a little of that contaminant and all of that rinsate out of there and out of the washing machine. But also it's important once you take those clothes out of the washing machine to run it on a cycle with no clothes in the washing machine to make sure you get any of that contaminant out of the washer itself , uh , recommended that , uh , if you have the capability to take those clothes and hang them on a clothesline exposed fully as much as possible to sunlight because, UV light also breaks down pesticides. So yeah, when doing that as opposed to just throwing them in the dryer, which of course you have to do the exact same , uh , that's a little bit more difficult. Um, it's always recommended to try to, to hang them on a clothesline because the air allows it to dry, allow, it exposes that pesticide to the elements , but also it gets exposed to the sunlight and that could further break down any residues that are on the clothes themselves. So that's another recommendation that you can take that, you know, some people, you know, again, you know, when you make application after application or if you're not familiar with making applications, these are things that people might not consider. But it just helps protect you and helps protect your family and it helps protect the integrity of the clothes you're wearing. Another question I get is, well what happens if I accidentally spilled a pesticide on on myself or I spill some on my jeans? If you have an exorbitant amount of pesticide on your clothes, it might just be worth it to just dispose of them rather than try to clean them just because the higher the concentrate, the more that's going to build up residues in your washer, especially if you're sharing that washing machine with your family. So that's another thing. So a lot of, a lot of what I've been talking about today seems like common sense and it is, but when you're out making applications and you have all these things on your mind or you know you've got to get to one location, you've got to make multiple application in the course of the day, you're in a rush. Sometimes you know the appropriate considerations for the proper use of personal protective equipment and also the proper care, of personal protective equipment is, is not necessarily followed to a tee. And in the midst of not having , um, personal protective equipment, replacements to purchase or that are available. If we do make these mistakes , these are things that we're going to have to really focus on because you know, that that one box of gloves, maybe all you have left for the remainder of the year. I , I don't know what the current situation is going to lead to, but...

Jessica :

R ight.

Leslie :

But yeah, I mean it's not necessarily novel information, but really taking care of your personal protective equipment is only going to ensure that it takes care of you in the long run as well. So all of these things are really important to consider. Labels don't include that information just to make it seem really boring when you have to read them. They're there , for your safety.

Jessica :

Yeah.

Leslie :

So make sure that these pesticides are being applied in the appropriate way , um, in a way that is going to generate successful pest control, but also in a safe and sustainable way. So when in doubt, always read the label, follow the label.

Jessica :

Always, always, always. Well , uh, that was really good information today and definitely much needed during these times. So I want to thank you again for being on my podcast.

Leslie :

Thank you for having me. I had a lot of fun.

Jessica :

Yeah, always good. Thanks everyone for listening. If you enjoy this podcast, don't forget to hit the subscribe button on Apple podcast, Stitcher, Google play, or whatever app you're using to listen to this podcast. Want more information? You can visit us at our website, grantextension.nmsu.edu follow us on Facebook at NMSU, Grant County, CES, Snapchat at Grant County NM 4-H, shoot us an email at [email protected] or give us a call, (575) 388-1559.

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New Mexico State University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and educator. NMSU and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.New Mexico State University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and educator. NMSU and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.New Mexico State University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and educator. NMSU and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.

Jessica :

Hooky with Sloane by Bird Creek Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons. Sound Effects provided by Soundsnap